How To Make Safety Training More Fun And Engaging
Mix up the format – One way to avoid safety training fatigue is to vary the format and delivery of your safety content. Don’t rely on the same old slides, videos, or manuals every time. Instead, try using interactive quizzes, games, simulations, or scenarios that challenge your employees to apply their knowledge and skills in realistic situations.

What are some funny safety meeting ideas?

Use memorable quotes, slogans, or rhymes – Another way to keep the learning effective beyond the safety meeting itself is to use memorable quotes and slogans. Our favorite memorable safety slogans include: “A spill, a slip, a hospital trip.” “When you gamble with safety, you bet your life.” “Falling on objects can be brutal, wear your hard hat to protect your noodle.” Feel free to make up an acronym, quote, or rhyme to keep the topic at the forefront of their minds.

What is safety engagement?

What is employee engagement? – In simple terms, employee engagement means that workers are committed to the organization and its objectives. Engaged employees feel connected to their employer, are highly motivated, and put forth their best effort at work.

When we talk about employee engagement with safety, we’re referring to employees who have a clear understanding of the organization’s safety objectives and are personally invested in achieving those outcomes. For example, an engaged construction worker puts on their fall protection harness every time they work at height — not just when a supervisor is watching.

3 ways to create a work culture that brings out the best in employees | Chris White | TEDxAtlanta

An engaged factory worker is diligent about following lockout/tagout procedures and ensuring others do the same.

How does safety bingo work?

Photo: CatLane/iStock / Getty Images Plus/Getty Images For Plantenance Landscape Group in Pointe-Claire, Quebec, Canada, safety is serious business, but there’s no reason employees can’t have a little fun with it, according to Glenn Curtis, founder and chief visionary officer of the company, which was founded 40 years ago.

  1. Enter safety bingo.
  2. Each employee receives a bingo card upon onboarding, and every day the company goes without an accident, employees receive their bingo number for the day.
  3. Upon winning, employees can collect a gift certificate for items such as groceries or fuel, valued between $100 and $250.
  4. Employees have a chance to win extra money for being safe, which they should want to do anyway,” Curtis says.

“We did it initially to create a fun culture but also to make sure they take safety seriously. We value their safety, and if they play it safe, we’ll tie it into a reward.” As with any game, there are rules. For example, employees must be on time to receive their number, and if they’re not present at work, they don’t get their number for the day.

At the beginning of the season, the pot starts out at $100 and goes up between $20-$50 every time there’s a winner, maxing out at $250. If there are double winners, they split the prize, and if there’s a claimable accident, the pot goes back down to $100. Employees can win a maximum of two times in a 30-day period.

The company started playing the game about 15 years ago, and in peak season, about 20 employees participate. “Our safety record is phenomenal, and if we’re late on issuing a number, we’ll get a call from the foremen,” Curtis says. “Money is a great motivator.

Why is OSHA interesting?

Improved Public Health – By improving workplace safety, OSHA helps protect not only workers but also the public from potential hazards and environmental risks. Employers will find that implementing safety training also brings other benefits, such as:

Reduced costs, including significant reductions in workers’ compensation premiums Engaged workers Increased productivity Improved employee morale Enhanced social responsibility goals Increased productivity and enhanced overall business operations

By implementing a suitable training program and setting achievable goals, workplaces can advance towards higher levels of safety and health achievement.

What are the three Cs of safety?

Director/Senior Instructor-Health, Safety & Security – CEM, NCSO, CCRM, CAE, CSEP, COHS, CHSO, CIRT – Published Dec 23, 2020 When we talk about workplace Health and Safety, too often we concentrate on creating comprehensive policies and complicated procedures without focusing on the basics.

  1. Anything we design or develop for Health and Safety must adhere to the fundamental principles of being Clear, Consistent and Communicated,
  2. First, whether Policy, Safe Work Procedures (SWP) or even Tool Talks.
  3. It is important to keep the message simple and Clear,
  4. Too often, we complicate things unintentionally through complex design and the message quickly gets lost in translation.

Use the building block methodology of imparting knowledge by keeping things simple, easy-to-understand and avoid using complex terminology. This way, workers can relate to it and are more apt to remember it. Second, ensure everything you write, develop and present is Consistent,

  • This takes thoughtful planning and ensures your Health and Safety program sends the same message to everyone.
  • And, equally importantly, is ensuring that those individuals delivering the message are delivering the same message to everyone.
  • Inconsistent messages regarding Health and Safety leads to misinterpretation and personal interpretation and inferences.
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Ultimately, leading to confusion and an unsafe work environment. Finally, anything involving Health and Safety programs and/or procedures is of no value unless people know about it. So, ensure the information or message is Communicated and in a timely manner,

Make the effort to assess the audience(s) and plan how and where the information will be presented. Remember, communication is a process so it is important to listen to feedback and make adjustments so that you get your messages across in a way your audience best retains it Communication is such an integral part of an effective Health and Safety program.

For Health and Safety professionals, interpersonal communication and public speaking are fundamental skills we must all have. And, like anything else. It takes practice to hone those skills to be a better, more effective communicator.

What is the doorknob rule?

Nearly 14 years ago, Mit Ellis, a 26-year-old living in the U.K., witnessed a scene that would stay with him for life. He’d just entered a new school, and while he was perturbed to see it, he assumed it was “part of the lifestyle there.” A kid got punched in the arm for not saying “safety” after he farted.

“It seemed like a bizarre ritual,” he tells MEL, “but there was no avoiding it, so my friends and I naturally joined in.” For the following six years, Ellis became conditioned to saying “safety” after every burp or fart — it was the only way he could protect himself from being punched until he touched a doorknob.

To the uninitiated, this is a bizarre ritual. But to many men now in their late 20s and early 30s, this was merely an accepted law of growing up. The rule is simple, though many of us learned it the hard way: If you fart — especially if it’s audible — you must say “safety” before your friends can say “doorknob.” Otherwise, they proceed to punch you until you get up and touch a doorknob.

Decades later, the game still haunts those who fell victim to it. This is the Adult Male Doorknob Phenomenon. Why can’t millennial males shake it? Perhaps it’s the years of conditioning. Perhaps it’s the nostalgic appeal. But for some reason, many men have taken to the internet to wonder if anyone else — now grown adults with jobs and responsibilities — still whisper “safety” to themselves after farting.

It’s an deeply ingrained impulse they’re unable to avoid, even when they’re sitting alone with no visible threat of punches. When you’re 25 and you still say “safety” after every fart. from CasualUK What weird habit can’t you kick? from AskReddit “I still say safety and I’m over 30,” says one redditor in an r/Nostalgia post asking if anyone else used to play it.

  1. Hell, I say it even when there’s no one around to punch me.
  2. Some habits die hard.” Ellis echoes the sentiment: “I finished school 10 years ago now, I’ve even moved away from where I grew up, but I still catch myself saying it out loud.
  3. A few weeks ago while driving on my own I said it out loud.
  4. I guess it’s just a habit.” The people who still say “safety” after they fart are the same people who answer internet polls and answer toll free calls — Will Johnson (@WillyJ42214) February 13, 2019 He adds that he’ll do it especially with audible farts, as if it excuses the fart or breaks the tension an audible fart causes.

“Mainly in case I think someone may have heard,” he says. Eliot, now 29, is another adult man who was conditioned to say safety after farting. He too played the game through his teen years, but stopped right around 17 or 18, he says. Do people still say “safety” after they fart??? — JJ (@dirtyyghettokid) January 27, 2019 “After that, I really don’t know why I continued saying it,” he tells MEL,

For the first few years, I would say it really quietly under my breath; no one ever noticed I don’t think but for I guess the last six or so years I only ‘think’ the word safety now.” In reflection, Eliot “just my mind just does it by default, which is quite weird now that I come to think of it.” To this day, I still say safety when I fart — scott tran (@scottytrannn) November 3, 2017 Eliot theorizes it’s just because he has “a routine-like personality when it comes to certain things, and this just kind of stuck.” But what about the rest? I reached out to Dr.

Claudia Luiz, a psychoanalyst based in Tarrytown, New York, and author of The Making of a Psychoanalyst, to explain the Adult Male Doorknob Phenomenon. As it turns out, there’s a lot more going on with this game than just farts and punches. Luiz says this game serves as a sort of preparation for boys to become men by providing a safe space to practice managing our fight-or-flight responses.

” creates a threat,” she explains, “which activates fight-or-flight response, for which there is a solution. So it involves quick thinking, courage and exposing yourself to a threat. All very traditionally ‘masculine’ activities that would prepare men for hunting and for war.” Sure, it’s possible that all the farting and punching were easing us into the varied stresses of modern manhood.

So why do guys like Ellis and Eliot still quietly whisper “safety” alone in their apartments after eking out a fart? Luiz says this is a Pavlovian response: Saying “safety” after farting has been (literally) beaten into their reward systems. “The reward is palpable,” she explains.

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That is, we will feel safe if we say ‘safety’ after the behavior that creates a threat.” She adds, “It’s a double reward, really. The first reward is conjuring a game that creates the threat or challenge, and then there’s the reward of being quick enough to be safe. We may not forget this game, just for the sheer pleasure of it.” There is, however, a less-fun counter-theory about why guys might play a silent doorknob game long into adulthood.

Is it possible, I wondered, that some guys were experiencing mild PTSD? PTSD is based on the brain being “unable to let go of a threat,” Luiz explains, and just like with a Pavlovian response, “the brain wants to remember so that it can control a positive outcome.” Luiz says it comes down to how individual guys experienced and played the game to determine whether the reflexive urge to say “safety” after farting is due to PTSD, “activating cortisol and adrenaline,” or due to a Pavlovian response “activating dopamine responses.” “I will bet that since all men are different, you’d find variations in their shared impulse to keep replaying the word ‘safety’ even when they are already safe,” Luiz concludes.

What is the most safeties one game?

Records – The NFL team record for safeties in a game is three, which all occurred when the Los Angeles Rams recorded three against the New York Giants on September 30, 1984. The individual record is two, by the Rams’ Fred Dryer against the Green Bay Packers on October 21, 1973.

Jared Allen, Ted Hendricks, Justin Houston and Doug English share the NFL career record for safeties with four. League-wide, the record for most safeties scored by all teams in a regular season is 26 in 1988. The fewest safeties scored across the league is 0, occurring in 1943. The season with the greatest frequency of safeties was 1932, with eight safeties in 48 games (one safety every six games).

The season with the lowest frequency of safeties, outside of the 1943 season, was 1966, with three safeties in 105 games (one safety every 35 games). Only three regular-season NFL games have ever ended in overtime with a safety: in 1989 when the Minnesota Vikings defeated the Los Angeles Rams 23–21 when Mike Merriweather blocked a punt into the end zone, in 2004 when the Chicago Bears defeated the Tennessee Titans 19–17 when Billy Volek fumbled in his own end zone and a teammate recovered it but was unable to get out of the end zone, and in 2013 when the Miami Dolphins defeated the Cincinnati Bengals 22–20 when Cameron Wake sacked Andy Dalton in the end zone.

In a 1989 pre-season game, the New York Jets defeated the host Kansas City Chiefs 15–13 in overtime when Jets defensive lineman Dennis Byrd sacked Chiefs third-string quarterback Mike Elkins in the end zone. The NCAA does not keep individual statistics for safeties. Three FBS teams have scored three safeties in a game: Arizona State in 1996 (in a 19-0 victory over then-No.1 and two-time defending national champion Nebraska, ending the Cornhuskers’ 26-game winning streak); North Texas in 2003; and Bowling Green in 2005.

In the FCS, Montana State scored four safeties against Weber State in 2022, all of them on errant snaps out of the end zone, setting an FCS record. The University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2007 scored only six points in a game, from three safeties against Rhode Island,

  1. UMass had also scored three safeties in a game against Albany in 2005, a Division I-AA record.
  2. In 2004, when Iowa defeated Penn State 6–4, because of Iowa’s two field goals and Penn State’s two safeties, it was the only instance of such a score in the modern era, and it was the first time since Florida lost to Miami 31–4 in 1987 that a team finished a game with exactly four points.

The only other occasion on which a game ended with that score was when Rutgers defeated Princeton in 1869 by six “runs” to four in what is recognized as the first intercollegiate football game.

What is motivation in safety?

1. Background – According to recent accident statistics, 4900 deaths and 3.7 million disabling injuries occurred in American workplaces. However, data from the National Safety Council (NSC) on occupational injuries and deaths rates are likely to be underestimated ( 1, 2 ), because the cost of work injuries and deaths will be much higher than the NSC estimate ( 3 ) if the following are accounted for: non-economic consequences of injury and accidents, such as pain and suffering experienced by workers and their families, decreased social functioning, and negative impact on family and workplace relationships ( 3 ).

  • According to the Iranian Legal Medicine Organization, in the first seven months of 2012, 1,101 people were killed in work-related accidents, a 24% increase over the same period in 2011 ( 4 ).
  • Therefore, the best way to reduce occupational injury and accident rates seems to be to investigate the social and organizational factors influencing workplace safety ( 5 ).
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One such factor is employees’ motivation to work safely ( 6 ). Safety motivation refers to an individual’s willingness to engage in safety behaviors and the value attached to those behaviors ( 7 ). The purpose of safety motivation is preventing accidents and injury at the desirable safety level by using scientific principles and procedures.

  • Safety motivation influences adherence to safety procedures, and has been found to ensure safety of not only individuals but also organizations and even society ( 8 ).
  • Although employee safety motivation has been considered important since the beginning of the twentieth century, researchers have only lately begun systematic research on this construct.

Most research has emphasized the effect of worker safety motivation on injury and accident rates, and indicates that organizations can influence workers unsafe behaviors both directly and indirectly by influencing workers safety motivation ( 7, 9 – 11 ).

Zohar ( 12 ) indicated that employee safety motivation can influence unsafe work behavior and consequent occupational accidents. People can be motivated to improve their behavior according to cultural norms if they perceive that compliance will lead to a desirable outcome ( 13 ). Moreover, a number of safety researchers have examined how performance pressure can influence safety within organizations.

Work pressure, which is composed of excessive workload, excessive work pace, and time constraints, has been revealed to be a causal factor of both occupational accidents and unsafe work behavior ( 3 ). Work pressure increases the likelihood that an individual will engage in accidents by adopting “short cut” work methods ( 14 ).

Furthermore, in the face of time constraints, individuals can begin to perceive that risk taking is part of their work. In other words, individuals realize that there is not enough time to follow safe practices ( 14 ). Work pressure is likely to lead to increased psychological stress among workers, which in turn increases the probability of occupational accidents ( 3 ).

Thus, workers will ignore safe procedures when they feel the need to act quickly. These short cuts or unsafe behaviors often become the norm since they allow employees to perform tasks much more quickly and effectively ( 15 ). Lusa et al. ( 16 ) reported that working overtime increased the risk of accidents among firefighters in 71 fire brigades in Finland.

What is good awareness of safety?

Safety awareness is the habit of thinking about the chance that someone can get hurt or property damage before a task is started. Having policies and procedures is not enough. You need to make sure that everyone is aware of them and that they think about safety in everything they do.

How does safety bingo work?

Photo: CatLane/iStock / Getty Images Plus/Getty Images For Plantenance Landscape Group in Pointe-Claire, Quebec, Canada, safety is serious business, but there’s no reason employees can’t have a little fun with it, according to Glenn Curtis, founder and chief visionary officer of the company, which was founded 40 years ago.

Enter safety bingo. Each employee receives a bingo card upon onboarding, and every day the company goes without an accident, employees receive their bingo number for the day. Upon winning, employees can collect a gift certificate for items such as groceries or fuel, valued between $100 and $250. “Employees have a chance to win extra money for being safe, which they should want to do anyway,” Curtis says.

“We did it initially to create a fun culture but also to make sure they take safety seriously. We value their safety, and if they play it safe, we’ll tie it into a reward.” As with any game, there are rules. For example, employees must be on time to receive their number, and if they’re not present at work, they don’t get their number for the day.

  • At the beginning of the season, the pot starts out at $100 and goes up between $20-$50 every time there’s a winner, maxing out at $250.
  • If there are double winners, they split the prize, and if there’s a claimable accident, the pot goes back down to $100.
  • Employees can win a maximum of two times in a 30-day period.

The company started playing the game about 15 years ago, and in peak season, about 20 employees participate. “Our safety record is phenomenal, and if we’re late on issuing a number, we’ll get a call from the foremen,” Curtis says. “Money is a great motivator.